A Little Laughter – United Breaks Guitars

April 12, 2010

Speaking for a living has taken me all over the world.  I love seeing all the unique places and wonderful people.  The only problem is I have to go through the airports of the world to do it.

I guess it’s not so much the airport as the way that airport treats my one piece of critical baggage–my wheelchair.

It’s always scary to get off the plane to see what condition I am going to find my chair in. (For those who wonder how I travel on an airplane, see below.)

I’ve had it come off the plane with too many pieces and not enough pieces.  It’s come bent frames, bent wheels, bent backs and lost batteries (to name a few)–and when it does, I “get” to deal with the people in baggage claim because their people treated my $20,000.00 wheelchair like a $2.00 rag doll.

Then, after waiting in line, and processing my claim it still goes on.  Kinda like the time when Delta lost my chair, and after going through all the paperwork, they told me that I couldn’t take the Delta wheelchair with me. I spent literally 15 plus minutes trying to explain to the Delta rep. that I wasn’t real effective without any wheelchair at all. (At one point I wondered if I was going to have to crawl to the hotel on my elbows!)  But, in the end, just like everything else, things eventually work out and you move on to the next adventure.

However, all this experience made me appreciate Dave Carroll’s plight even more.  The trilogy below gave me a good laugh. It’s a healthy piece of the lighter side. If you don’t have the time, you don’t have to watch all three. The first is great all on it’s own.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

Jh-

PS.  When I get on a plane, they “gate check” my wheelchair, and I drive my chair right up to the entrance of the plane.  Once there, the airlines provide a couple of guys (hopefully guys–I’ve had two women over 50 show up before, and to say it was interesting is an understatement) to lift me from my chair onto a little “aisle chair”.  It’s called an aisle chair because it’s thin enough to travel up and down the aisles on an airplane. (See….the guys at the airlines figured that one out.)  Once on the aisle chair, they take my through the plane and lift me into a regular seat on the plane.

Jh-


A Little Laughter – Cake

March 22, 2010

If you’ve read my blog before, you know the importance I feel laughter plays in our ability to deal with change and live happy lives. (For more on this click here)  It’s amazing the impact humor can have in our quest for a joyful journey.  Just like a little sunshine on a gloomy day laughter can make dreary times bright.

In an effort to spread some more humor around, each monday people can come here to find some gut-bustin’ audio, side splittin’ video, or knee-slappin’ bit of written word.

I hope you’ll come regularly to get a giggle. I encourage you to listen, watch or read it, even if you’ve heard, seen, or read it before.  ‘Cause everyone can always use a little laughter.

…And starting us off, Jim Gaffigan talking about Cake.

Jh-


The Laughter Lesson

December 9, 2008

weirdal

Directly after I broke my neck everyone around me went into triage. The people who were responsible for my care made sure that I received the most important care first. The EMTs who first arrived on that beach at Lake Powell did only what was needed most to get me to the emergency room. The ER doc’s picked the most crucial areas of my health to concentrate on to prepare me for surgery. The surgeon’s cared only for my most critical needs to get me into the ICU. My ICU doctors worried only about those things that were most eminent to my survival.

My parents follow the same course. They decided to concentrate only on those things they felt were most important to keep my attitude up and my spirits high. Of those few things they picked to concentrate on one of them was to make sure I laughed.

Every day I was required to watch, listen to, read, or have read to me something that was funny. They didn’t care what it was as long as it made me laugh. At my request they left the hospital and went and purchased every “Weird Al” Yankovic or Bill Cosby album, every Don Knotts/Tim Conway or Monty Python video they could find.

No matter how bad the day, no matter how bad I felt, no matter how bad my situation I had to use these “tools” every day. It was made to be as important as any therapy session or surgical procedure. My parents wanted to ensure that laughter was a part of my life even on days when there didn’t seem to be much to laugh about.

The results were amazing. Regardless of how I felt Bill, Al, Don, Tim and the Pythons always made me smile. That smile always turn into a laugh, and that laugh into laughter. As I laughed my problems seem smaller and the day brighter.

Years later I try to use this important lesson in my life. I work hard to make sure that every day I find something to make me smile; to make me laugh. I have found that immersing myself in humor for some part of my day is as important as anything else I do to keep my attitude up.

This dedication to laughter has also allowed me to look at the lighter side of my life. I have found that when trying times come they go much easier when you find the humor in the situation and learn to laugh. Some may think it’s the crazy and at times a little twisted. But, I have found it impossible to smile and frown at the same time. I can’t do it–It is a physical impossibility.

Try it. Find something, anything that makes you laugh and make it a part of your daily regiment.  Make it a habit. Just like you brush your teeth and comb your hair everyday make sure you set aside some time to laugh. No matter how busy your schedule, find a way to fit it in. If you will you’ll find your bad days better, your good days greater, and your great days out of this world.

They key is to simply learn to laugh.

Jh-


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